The future of medtech is about connectivity and data

Here’s why medtech companies must embrace innovation, connectivity and disruption.

DeviceTalks

Healthcare must shift away from responding to acute episodes and focus on chronic and preventive care to provide better care, value, and population health. Data will inform the transition. Key questions include, “What does this mean for medtech? What role does medtech play in the future?”

The topic of innovation in healthcare — including devices, data, and disruption — was the focus of a recent episode of DeviceTalks Tuesdays, sponsored by S3 Connected Health.

Panelists included medical device experts Bill Betten, director of solutions – medtech for S3 Connected Health, and Michael Hill, PhD, retired VP of corporate science, technology and innovation at Medtronic and currently a partner at Science Innovation.

Here are five takeaways on the growing importance of data and disruption in medtech.

Get the full story on our s…

Read more
  • 0

The future of medtech is about connectivity and data

Here’s why medtech companies must embrace innovation, connectivity and disruption.

DeviceTalks

Healthcare must shift away from responding to acute episodes and focus on chronic and preventive care to provide better care, value, and population health. Data will inform the transition. Key questions include, “What does this mean for medtech? What role does medtech play in the future?”

The topic of innovation in healthcare — including devices, data, and disruption — was the focus of a recent episode of DeviceTalks Tuesdays, sponsored by S3 Connected Health.

Panelists included medical device experts Bill Betten, director of solutions – medtech for S3 Connected Health, and Michael Hill, PhD, retired VP of corporate science, technology and innovation at Medtronic and currently a partner at Science Innovation.

Here are five takeaways on the growing importance of data and disruption in medtech:

1. Medical devices are becoming connected

Initially, “T…

Read more
  • 0

How COVID-19 changed medical device clinical trials forever

The success of remote clinical trial oversight opens the door to hybrid approaches and creates new possibilities for the future of trials.

DeviceTalks

[Image from Unsplash]Because of the pandemic, virtually overnight, all players involved in medical device clinical trials had to pivot to virtual monitoring to keep trials going. What impact did remote trial oversight have on the quality, safety, and costs of clinical trials? What are the implications for the future?

A panel of experts from across the clinical trial ecosystem discussed these topics on a recent episode of DeviceTalks Tuesdays, sponsored by IMARC.

Panelists included Hamish Baird, clinical research president at Remington-Davis; Brandy Chittester, president of IMARC Research; Xavier Lefebvre, global VP of medical and regulatory operations at Medtronic; and Dr. Eric Kolodziej, corporate VP and global head of quality and regulatory affairs at Hologic.

Go to our sister site Medical Des…

Read more
  • 0

Mayo Clinic needed to engineer its way through COVID-19: Here’s what they did.

The health system’s medical and engineering staffs had to devise their own solutions for lab gear, PPE and operating room air decontamination.

[Image courtesy of Mayo Clinic]

As COVID-19 settles into several regions of the U.S., healthcare systems that once sat on the sidelines likely will find themselves in the same situation as their counterparts in the Northeast did earlier this year.

While this may serve as little comfort, hospitals in regions getting hit by the new wave of the deadly virus do have the benefit of seeing how hospitals in the Upper Midwest and the Northeast managed the pandemic.

One of the easiest — or at least most evident — lessons available is the use of additive manufacturing or 3D printing. Mayo Clinic and other hospital systems, including Beth Israel Lahey in Boston, used their 3D printers to produce critical personal protective equipment (PPE) such as masks and face shield…

Read more
  • 0

Mayo Clinic needed to engineer its way through COVID-19: Here’s what they did.

The health system’s medical and engineering staffs had to devise their own solutions for lab gear, PPE and operating room air decontamination.

[Image courtesy of Mayo Clinic]

As COVID-19 settles into several regions of the U.S., healthcare systems that once sat on the sidelines likely will find themselves in the same situation as their counterparts in the Northeast did earlier this year.

While this may serve as little comfort, hospitals in regions getting hit by the new wave of the deadly virus do have the benefit of seeing how hospitals in the Upper Midwest and the Northeast managed the pandemic.

One of the easiest — or at least most evident — lessons available is the use of additive manufacturing or 3D printing. Mayo Clinic and other hospital systems, including Beth Israel Lahey in Boston, used their 3D printers to produce critical personal protective equipment (PPE) such as masks and face shiel…

Read more
  • 0

Mayo Clinic needed to engineer its way through COVID-19: Here’s what they did.

The health system’s medical and engineering staffs had to devise their own solutions for lab gear, PPE and operating room air decontamination.

[Image courtesy of Mayo Clinic]

As COVID-19 settles into several regions of the U.S., healthcare systems that once sat on the sidelines likely will find themselves in the same situation as their counterparts in the Northeast did earlier this year.

While this may serve as little comfort, hospitals in regions getting hit by the new wave of the deadly virus do have the benefit of seeing how hospitals in the Upper Midwest and the Northeast managed the pandemic.

One of the easiest — or at least most evident — lessons available is the use of additive manufacturing or 3D printing. Mayo Clinic and other hospital systems, including Beth Israel Lahey in Boston, used their 3D printers to produce critical personal protective equipment (PPE) such as masks and face shiel…

Read more
  • 0