Stratasys donates 3D printers to University of Minnesota’s Visible Heart Lab

Paul Iaizzo, PhD, shows how a 3D printed anatomic model can be used for medical device testing. [Credit: U of M Medical School | Visible Heart Laboratories]

Stratasys (NASDAQ: SSYS) has donated Stratasys J750 Digital Anatomy 3D printers, as well as MakerBot Method X and MakerBot Sketch 3D printers, to the University of Minnesota’s Visible Heart Laboratories.

Located at the University of Minnesota Medical School, the Visible Heart Laboratories helps medical students, medical device creators, and many others utilize the benefits of 3D printing technology and anatomic models.

“The Visible Heart Laboratories are driven to train the next generation of medical device developers and provide them with the abilities to 3D print prototypes and/or virtually placed devices within real heart anatomies, as today these are considered essential skills,” said Paul Iaizzo, the medical school professor in charge of t…

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Stratasys expands anatomical modeling services for healthcare

A Stratasys 3D printed anatomical model of a spinal pedicel screw insertion (Photo courtesy of Stratasys)

Stratasys Direct Manufacturing now offers anatomical modeling and consultative services for the healthcare industry.

The Stratasys (NASDAQ: SSYS) subsidiary opened its new Healthcare Print Center in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, and soft-launched the new offerings with an invite-only beta test for medical device manufacturers. Over the past 13 weeks, Stratasys J750 Digital Anatomy printers have created more than 1,000 models, with each printer running more than 120 hours per week.

The printers build life-like medical and dental anatomical models for medical device manufacturers and healthcare providers to use in device testing, medical training, or surgical preparation and consultation. Stratasys launched the printers in 2019 and updated them with biomechanically realistic bone capabilities in 2020. Read more

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Smith College team wins ventilator design challenge

(Image courtesy of CoVent-19 Challenge)

A team of Smith College engineering alumnae, staff and faculty has won the CoVent-19 Challenge to design a rapidly deployable ventilator to address shortages caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in developing countries.

A dozen anesthesiology resident physicians from Massachusetts General Hospital kicked off the public challenge April 1, attracting 200 entries. The 30-person team from the Northampton, Mass., college took a winning design from concept through working prototype. The next step could be a final product for regulatory approval in Nigeria, one of the countries that have been talking with the CoVent-19 Challenge organizers.

Get the full story on our sister site, Medical Design & Outsourcing.

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Mayo Clinic needed to engineer its way through COVID-19: Here’s what they did.

The health system’s medical and engineering staffs had to devise their own solutions for lab gear, PPE and operating room air decontamination.

[Image courtesy of Mayo Clinic]

As COVID-19 settles into several regions of the U.S., healthcare systems that once sat on the sidelines likely will find themselves in the same situation as their counterparts in the Northeast did earlier this year.

While this may serve as little comfort, hospitals in regions getting hit by the new wave of the deadly virus do have the benefit of seeing how hospitals in the Upper Midwest and the Northeast managed the pandemic.

One of the easiest — or at least most evident — lessons available is the use of additive manufacturing or 3D printing. Mayo Clinic and other hospital systems, including Beth Israel Lahey in Boston, used their 3D printers to produce critical personal protective equipment (PPE) such as masks and face shiel…

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Mayo Clinic needed to engineer its way through COVID-19: Here’s what they did.

The health system’s medical and engineering staffs had to devise their own solutions for lab gear, PPE and operating room air decontamination.

[Image courtesy of Mayo Clinic]

As COVID-19 settles into several regions of the U.S., healthcare systems that once sat on the sidelines likely will find themselves in the same situation as their counterparts in the Northeast did earlier this year.

While this may serve as little comfort, hospitals in regions getting hit by the new wave of the deadly virus do have the benefit of seeing how hospitals in the Upper Midwest and the Northeast managed the pandemic.

One of the easiest — or at least most evident — lessons available is the use of additive manufacturing or 3D printing. Mayo Clinic and other hospital systems, including Beth Israel Lahey in Boston, used their 3D printers to produce critical personal protective equipment (PPE) such as masks and face shiel…

Read more
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Texas-based team seeks EUA for 3D printed emergency ventilator

A team of physicians and engineers developed a hands-free resuscitator bag compression device that can be utilized as an emergency ventilator during the COVID-19 pandemic.

As the pandemic goes on and a shortage of vital equipment, including ventilators, continues, a number of companies and research teams from all over have worked to create alternative options. One such alternative is this collaboration from researchers at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso and The University of Texas at El Paso, with contributions from Bessel, Ansys and Stratasys (NSDQ:SSYS).

Get the full story at our sister site, MassDevice.

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Texas-based team seeks EUA for 3D printed emergency ventilator

Image from Scott Crawford, TTUHSC El Paso

A team of physicians and engineers developed a hands-free resuscitator bag compression device that can be utilized as an emergency ventilator during the COVID-19 pandemic.

As the pandemic goes on and a shortage of vital equipment, including ventilators, continues, a number of companies and research teams from all over have worked to create alternative options. One such alternative is this collaboration from researchers at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso and The University of Texas at El Paso, with contributions from Bessel, Ansys and Stratasys (NSDQ:SSYS).

The Texas Breather (TM) is designed to fall into the FDA’s new category of devices that qualify for emergency use authorization (EUA), the emergency use resuscitator systems (EURS). It includes an adjustable degree of compression and respiratory rate with a simple design that inclu…

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