QurAlis homes in on drug candidates for subset of ALS patients

The Cambridge, Massachusetts–headquartered biotech QurAlis kicked the year off by launching a Phase 1 clinical study of QRL-101 (QRA-244), a potentially novel selective Kv7.2/7.3 ion channel opener to treat hyperexcitability-induced disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

QRL-101 targets Kv7.2/7.3 potassium channels. Kv7 modulation can potentially lower spinal and cortical motor neuron excitability, potentially improving ALS patient survival.

QurAlis company is building a pipeline of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and small molecule programs for ALS subtypes that constitute the majority of ALS cases. In addition to QRL-101, its pipeline includes QRL-201, QRL-203, QRL-204 and QRL-202.

QRL-201 is also the focus of a Phase 1 trial.

The company’s QR43 Platform facilitates the discovery and development of novel therapies for TDP-43 pathologies, which are involved in some patients with ALS, frontotemporal degeneration and Alzheime…

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QurAlis homes in on drug candidates for subset of ALS patients

The Cambridge, Massachusetts–headquartered biotech QurAlis kicked the year off by launching a Phase 1 clinical study of QRL-101 (QRA-244), a potentially novel selective Kv7.2/7.3 ion channel opener to treat hyperexcitability-induced disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

QRL-101 targets Kv7.2/7.3 potassium channels. Kv7 modulation can potentially lower spinal and cortical motor neuron excitability, potentially improving ALS patient survival.

QurAlis company is building a pipeline of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and small molecule programs for ALS subtypes that constitute the majority of ALS cases. In addition to QRL-101, its pipeline includes QRL-201, QRL-203, QRL-204 and QRL-202.

QRL-201 is also the focus of a Phase 1 trial.

The company’s QR43 Platform facilitates the discovery and development of novel therapies for TDP-43 pathologies, which are involved in some patients with ALS, frontotemporal degeneration and Alzheime…

Read more
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QurAlis bolsters its executive team with three new leaders

Cambridge, Massachusetts–based biotech QurAlis Corp., has appointed Bryan Boggs as head of regulatory affairs. In addition, Christopher Gerry Lohan will join as head of clinical operations, and Guzide Adhikari will take on the role of head of global supply chain management.

The company is focused on developing novel treatments for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative diseases with genetically validated targets.

The three new hires will “play a critical role as we advance our deep pipeline of novel therapeutics for ALS and beyond to help patients desperately in need of treatment options,” said QurAlis CEO Kasper Roet in a statement.

Boggs joins QurAlis from Eli Lilly, where he worked for more than 30 years. His most recent role at the company was director, global regulatory and pharmacovigilance.

Lohan has more than 20 years of clinical research experience. In his last role, he worked as the director of clinical operation…

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QurAlis selects development candidate for ALS

Privately-held biotech QurAlis plans to begin clinical development for the first-in-class molecule QRL-201 for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in the second half of 2022.

QRL-201 is now the subject of IND-enabling studies.

The drug candidate targets the restoration of STATHMIN-2 (STMN2) expression in ALS. STMN2 is a protein encoded by the STMN2 gene that is involved in neural repair. ALS is often associated with decreased expression of STMN2.

In ALS patient-derived motor neuron disease models with TDP43 pathology, QRL-201 restored STMN2 loss of function.

A 2008 study in Current Opinion in Neurology found that TDP43 is involved in ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) pathogenesis.

TDP43 pathology is also present in some Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease patients.

“QRL-201 could potentially benefit ALS patients who have a loss of STMN2 due to TDP43 pathology, which could, in turn, slow disease progression,” explained Kasper Roet…

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