Harvard researchers are closer to human heart fabrication

A biohybrid model of a four-chambered heart engineered with focused rotary jet spinning (FRJS) technology [Image courtesy of Harvard SEAS]

Harvard University researchers used focused rotary jet spinning (FRJS) technology to fabricate polymer fibers that mimic the helical structure of heart muscles.

They created ventricle structures with the method and then seeded them with rat cardiomyocyte or human stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte cells, according to a news release from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University. Roughly a week later, they had several thin layers of beating tissue covering the scaffold. The cells in the beating tissue followed the same helical alignment as the fibers underneath.

The bioengineers, who were from the Wyss Institue and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), were then able to run experiments that comp…

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They said it at DeviceTalks Boston

Proximie CEO Nadine Hachach-Haram [Photo courtesy of Proximie]Medtech insiders convened at DeviceTalks Boston 2022 in May to discuss device design, innovation and trends shaping the industry now and in the years and decades ahead.

Here are some of the most quotable insights from panelists and speakers at our live event.

And make sure to save the date — and save your seat — for DeviceTalks West in Santa Clara, California on Oct. 19 and 20.

Get the full story at our sister site, Medical Design & Outsourcing.

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They said it at DeviceTalks Boston

Proximie CEO Nadine Hachach-Haram [Photo courtesy of Proximie]

Medtech insiders convened at DeviceTalks Boston 2022 in May to discuss device design, innovation and trends shaping the industry now and in the years and decades ahead.

Here are some of the most quotable insights from panelists and speakers at our live event.

And make sure to save the date — and save your seat — for DeviceTalks West in Santa Clara, California on Oct. 19 and 20.

Read on to hear what medtech leaders had to say at DeviceTalks Boston 2022.

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Here’s where Harvard’s engineering dean sees medtech research going

Harvard University constructed a 500,000-square-foot Science and Engineering Complex (SEC) for SEAS in Boston’s Allston neighborhood in 2020. [Image courtesy of Harvard SEAS]

Surgical robotics, artificial intelligence, and combatting climate change are but some of the priorities that have Harvard’s engineering school dean excited.

Speaking today at DeviceTalks Boston, Frank J. Doyle III described the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences as a “well-kept secret” historically. But Harvard engineering is staking out a strong position when it comes to medtech innovation.

Doyle noted that the school he runs has 5% of the faculty — and produces 40% of the startups out of Harvard.

Get the full story at our sister site, MassDevice.

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Here’s where Harvard’s engineering dean sees medtech research going

Harvard University constructed a 500,000-square-foot Science and Engineering Complex (SEC) for SEAS in Boston’s Allston neighborhood in 2020. [Image courtesy of Harvard SEAS]Surgical robotics, artificial intelligence, and combatting climate change are but some of the priorities that have Harvard’s engineering school dean excited.

Speaking today at DeviceTalks Boston, Frank J. Doyle III described the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences as a “well-kept secret” historically. But Harvard engineering is staking a strong position when it comes to medtech innovation.

Doyle noted that the school he runs has 5% of the faculty — and produces 40% of the startups out of Harvard.

The university constructed a 500,000-square-foot Science and Engineering Complex (SEC) for SEAS in Boston’s Allston neighborhood in 2020. Other exciting developments include a $500 million gift from Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg …

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