Philips-backed study says more could be done to treat cardiac device infections

Roughly four in five Americans with cardiac implantable electronic device infections don’t receive recommended treatment, according to a Philips-funded study out of Duke University.

The large-scale, real-world analysis of CMS data also found that complete hardware extraction within 6 days was associated with a 42.9% lower risk of death than among patients who did not undergo device removal. Groups including the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) have recommended extraction for all patients with a definite CIED infection, including complete device and lead removal.

Duke University researchers unveiled the results at the American College of Cardiology’s 71st Annual Scientific Session, which is wrapping up today in Washington, D.C.

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5 of the latest cardiac tech insights out of ACC.21

The American College of Cardiology’s 70th Annual Scientific Session has produced some positive news about some controversial cardiac tech.

Drug-coated stents, which a 2018 study linked to late-stage death, were shown to be non-inferior to non-drug-coated stents in patients with peripheral arterial disease. And a new study of renal denervation that used a different methodology showed significant progress in reducing high blood pressure.

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Edwards Lifesciences tricuspid valve reduced leakage in 98% of patients

Edwards Lifesciences‘s Evoque tricuspid valve replacement system reduces tricuspid heart valve leakage to non-traceable or mild leakage in 98% of patients, according to a new study reported at the American College of Cardiology’s 70th Annual Scientific Session.

Evoque is designed to replace native tricuspid valves without open-heart surgery. The valve is implanted using a minimally invasive delivery system where a doctor places a thin tube through a vein in the leg to reach the patient’s heart and perform the valve replacement procedure.

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Medical societies issue ‘urgent letter’ on racial violence

A trio of medical societies issued an urgent letter to denounce the racism and violence unfolding in the wake of George Floyd’s death in police custody.

The letter, dated May 30 (five days after Floyd was killed in Minneapolis), was issued by the Association of Black Cardiologists and its cardiovascular partners, the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Signed by the presidents of all three societies, Dr. Michelle Albert (ABC), Dr. Robert Harrington (AHA) and Dr. Athena Poppas (ACC), the letter highlighted that heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death for communities of color, and that societies are disturbed by the “violent acts that cut to the core of the lives of our community.”

The letter highlighted Floyd’s death, along with the killing of Ahmaud Arbery in Brunswick, Ga., the death of emergency medical technician Breonna Taylor in her Louisville, Ky., home at the hands of police, …

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